Tag Archives: Latin

Interview 015 – Fr. Michael Driscoll on Exorcism and the Traditional Latin Mass


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Smaller Version:         Part 1              Part 2

fr_driscollToday we are joined by Fr. Michael Driscoll, a priest of the diocese of Peoria IL, for a frank conversation about the TLM vs. the NO, issues in the liturgy following Vatican II, as well as issues relating to exorcism and his book Demons, Deliverance Discernment: Separating Fact from Fiction about the Spirit World. Continue reading

De Romano Pontifice Published for the first time in English!

de_romano_pontifice_front_coverJust today is a historic day for Bellarmine. Today is the first time his work “On the Roman Pontiff” has been made available in English translation. This is a beautiful and fantastic polemical and apologetic work defending the Papacy from the attacks of 16th century Protestants, many of the arguments of whom are used today, even though Bellarmine actually refuted them quite well.

Now, I have a special offer for readers of this website. This work retails for $20.00 on Mediatrix Press, but I have arranged that readers of this website may purchase the book at a discount using the following link: Athanasius Contra Mundum Discount! That is, with the discount it will be less than the price of On the Marks of the Church even though it is twice the size! This offer won’t last forever.

Thanks again to everyone whose support has made this possible.

Temporary break

I apologize for the break in posting. I was hoping to keep things more regular. I have, however, been very busy. Later today, I hope to announce the publication of the first-ever English translation of St. Robert Bellarmine’s De Romano Pontifice, books 1-2. Books 3-5 are planned for next month, depending on the editors.

It is interesting. After I produce a rough draft, which isn’t usually as hard on grammar as on punctuation, I then go and edit and reformulate a bit. Then the editor gets it and I get it back with a ton of red. Most of it is punctuation. The problem is when you are looking at a book from the 1580s, you tend to use the punctuation you are looking at unless you can consciously stop and think about what you’re doing, which is hard when your managing making the English work. Usually, it is that commas and semicolons are in the exact opposite places they ought and things of that sort.Then there is the Oxford comma. I love the Oxford comma, no one else does. Then there are the differences between US and UK spelling, and I get mixed up as I admire UK English and so wish we used it over here. (btw, now would be a good time to apologize to any UK readers of my work for not using what I consider your superior style in spelling and punctuation).

Then I run spell check, which is tedious because of the large number names that you have to either add or skip, then I format it for a proof copy, then I read it over again. Then I control F and look for the common spelling errors as a result of my typing speed, such as hte for the, and the like, and surprisingly I always get at least one, even after all the aforesaid labor! Then I normally give things like this to my wife, because, though she is not theologically trained, she is sharp and has a good sense for what people will understand, and make further recommendations which are usually very good, unless it’s on an area of technical terminology or something. That saved my tail with the last Bellarmine translation, because I do my own translations from the fathers, and a few of them made sense to me because I looked at the Latin and the Greek and it made sense, but in plain English it was too harsh, so I had to discipline myself to take a careful look. The frustrating thing is I do the work of about five people who are normally involved in the production of the book, including the cover design.

At any rate, I hope to make this announcement later in the day, once the proof is approved and the Amazon page loads. You can also buy it direct from me, and I will have that page linked up as well.

Thanks to all for the prayers and support for the Robert Bellarmine project. I know most people will buy the book for Book II, Chapter 30 (loss of papal office), but that is a minor point. On that note, a sedevacantist e-mailed me demanding to know if I translated that particular section correctly. The cheek! One can rest assured that while I may make an error, I will never mis-represent something in translation. You will find that section better than it is currently found online.

But don’t get mired in a 7 page explication out of a 330 page book! There are so many amazing things in here. In fact, in the wikipedia page on Papal primacy, they list a number of arguments against Papal primacy as though they were unanswerable, yet they are all refuted by Bellarmine in this book. Things like did the African Bishops reject papal authority in the Sixth Council of Carthage? Did Peter go to Rome? The chronology and history of Peter. That only the Bishop of Rome has been held to be the head of the whole Church. Every argument is grounded in Scripture and the Fathers. Bellarmine also injects a good bit of humor into the book. For instance: “Illyricus (a Lutheran) has published a book on this subject, which is filled with lies, abuse, and besides two arguments.”

I might even have a special deal for all readers of this website.

Francisco Suarez on what to do if the Pope falls into heresy…

suarez

Francisco Suarez, S.J. “Doctor Eximius”

 

For some time the question of the loss of papal office has been of interest to certain segments of Traditionalism. One of the many “Francis-effects” we could speak of, however, is that this question has gone mainstream due to the Pontiff’s many gaffes or statements that at least leave one scratching their head to figure it out, even amongst some conservatives who are not Traditionalists. In fact, Francis’ papacy is causing a lot of discussion on a lot of issues regarding the Papacy as such, and in particular in the conservative world, as can be seen from Antionio Socci, a conservative, non-Trad Medjugorie devotee, who questions Francis’ election and even published a book on the subject. Now I’m not saying Francis is a heretic or not really the Pope, even though I can properly say I am perplexed and often annoyed when he says nearly anything. Regardless of what I think, this is becoming an increasingly discussed issue.

So, in order to add something positive to the question, I have provided Suarez’s assessment of the loss of Papal office, which will be an interesting addition to the more generally known opinion of his Jesuit confrere St. Robert Bellarmine. Continue reading

A Preview of De Romano Pontifice: Peter alone was made a Bishop by Christ

de_romano_pontifice_front_coverI am preparing to publish volume 1 of my translation of De Romano Pontifice, which will embrace books 1 and 2, very soon. The editing has taken a little longer than I thought it would, though it has helped me to catch up on finishing books 3 and 4 and hopefully starting on 5 (the shortest one) for release as volume 2.

So today I have decided to post a snippet as a preview of the work, which will hopefully be published soon. Continue reading

Interview 009 – Stephen Hand


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Stephen_handToday we are joined by Stephen Hand, a writer, researcher and Traditional Catholic [though, as Stephen says, some hold this last part in doubt], for a wide ranging conversation of his view of the collapse of society from his youth to when he came into the Church, as well as the early American Traditional Catholic movement. Stephen will also discuss events involving the Remnant, which will be of great interest to many; as well as topics such as criticism of the Pope, the New World Order , the war on terror and Dorothy Day in a lengthy, though endlessly fascinating interview which will surprise many who have preconceived notions of Mr. Hand’s positions. Continue reading

End of the Reform of the Reform

CaravaggioEcceHomoThe family split in the Matt family, which formed the two different conservative newspapers, the Wanderer and the Remnant respectively, is perhaps a microcosm of conservative movements in the Church here in the United States (in Europe, Latin America, and elsewhere, it is similar but different in many respects, e.g. European traditionalists I have known find the American Traditionalist obsession with women wearing skirts and veils puzzling. Thus not all issues are the same. So what I am going to say here is only intended with reference to the situation in this country).

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