Category Archives: History

Interview 024 – Constantine Molitor on the Persecution of the Church in Germany under the Third Reich


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Priests lined up in Dachau, with the triangle denoting they are clergy.

Priests lined up in Dachau, with the triangle denoting they are clergy.

Today we are joined from Germany by Constantine Mollitor who gives the real story of the persecution of the Catholic Church by the Third Reich. In great detail, Constantine dispels the myth of “Hitler’s Pope” and other assorted nonsense with the real details of the Church’s resistance to, as well as persecution by the Nazi regime. Apart from the political and historical details of how the Nazi state broke up Catholic life in Germany, Constantine also shares the many stories of German priests sent to Dachau or other labor camps for upholding the Catholic Faith.

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Books

The Kings Depart: The Tragedy of Germany, Versailles and the German Revolution
Hitler’s War by David Irving (NB: Constantine did not recommend this book, but I did because of its erudition. You can ignore that Irving is a famous holocaust denier [though he was walked some of that back], because none of that is taken up in the book which was written before he went down that path and is only based on primary sources).
The Myth of Hitler’s Pope by Rabbi David Dahlan
Priestblock 25487: A Memoir of Dachau

German Books:

Kreuz und Hakenkreuz by Fr. Neuhaeusler
Erich Klausner (by Walter Adolph)
Geheime Aufzeichnungen (by Walter Adolph)

References

NB: Some links are to wikipedia, which is provided as a basis for research and acquiring more info, not as an end all and be all source of information, usually because it was one of the only pages available in English.
Jewish Groups oppose the Beatification and Canonization of Pius XII
860,000 Jews saved by Pius XII
Rosa Luxemburg
Karl Liebknecht
Freikorps
Bolshevik takeover
Dietrich Eckart – Thule Society
Munich Putsch, 9 November 1923/ Beer Hall Putsch
Reichskonkordat
Quote from Mit Brennender Sorge:
“When, in 1933, We consented, Venerable Brethren, to open negotiations for a concordat, which the Reich Government proposed on the basis of a scheme of several years’ standing; and when, to your unanimous satisfaction, We concluded the negotiations by a solemn treaty, We were prompted by the desire, as it behooved Us, to secure for Germany the freedom of the Church’s beneficent mission and the salvation of the souls in her care, as well as by the sincere wish to render the German people a service essential for its peaceful development and prosperity. Hence, despite many and grave misgivings, We then decided not to withhold Our consent for We wished to spare the Faithful of Germany, as far as it was humanly possible, the trials and difficulties they would have had to face, given the circumstances, had the negotiations fallen through. It was by acts that We wished to make it plain, Christ’s interests being Our sole object, that the pacific and maternal hand of the Church would be extended to anyone who did not actually refuse it.
If, then, the tree of peace, which we planted on German soil with the purest intention, has not brought forth the fruit, which in the interest of your people, We had fondly hoped, no one in the world who has eyes to see and ears to hear will be able to lay the blame on the Church and on her Head. The experiences of these last years have fixed responsibilities and laid bare intrigues, which from the outset only aimed at a war of extermination. In the furrows, where We tried to sow the seed of a sincere peace, other men — the “enemy” of Holy Scripture — oversowed the cockle of distrust, unrest, hatred, defamation, of a determined hostility overt or veiled, fed from many sources and wielding many tools, against Christ and His Church. They, and they alone with their accomplices, silent or vociferous, are today responsible, should the storm of religious war, instead of the rainbow of peace, blacken the German skies.” nos. 3-4

Cardinal Schulte, Bishop Klein, Archbishop Bertram condemned Nazi brutality in 1933
Cardinal Bertram (German, but readable with Google Translate)
Cardinal Faulhalber Archbishop of Munich-Freising, asked Hitler to release political prisoners in Dachau.
Catholic priests in Dachau.
SS members required to defend their honor in a duel
Nazi harassment of the Church: forbidding sermons, restricting processions, restriction of Masses
Anti-Catholic propaganda in SS Weekly newspaper Das Schwarze Korps
Der Stürmer, published by Julius Streicher.

Alleged alliance of Jews, Jesuits and Freemasons
Nazicartoons copy

Anti-Pacelli (Pius XII) political cartoons
nazicartoon1

Push for pan-denominational secular schools by the Nazis
Nazis eliminated Catholic schools by decree
Expropriations of Religious Houses
Nazi destruction of the Catholic press in Germany
Mitt Brennender Sorge
Nazi reaction to the encyclical
Maronite Catholic filmmaker jailed for making movie critical of Islam (in the US)
Nazis always hostile to Cardinal Pacelli
Praise for Pius XII by Jewish groups immediately following his election
Dutch Bishops condemned persecution of the Jews in Holland, and Nazis responded by deporting more Jews as well as Catholics of Jewish decent.
SS paratroopers planned to kidnap Pius XII in 1945.
Erich Klausner, killed for being a political Catholic
Blessed Jakob Gapp, Priest tricked by Nazis pretending to be Jews in need sent to concentration camp
Fr. Neururer martyr for marriage; warned a woman from marrying a local Nazi boss in Tyrol because he was divorced with no annulment. Died at Buchenwald: German; English
Fr. Häfner priest in Bavaria, made a Nazi party member publicly condemn his own divorce
Ordination of Blessed Karl Leisner in Dachau.
Carmelite convent removed from Auschwitz after protest from Israel
St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Bl. Titus Brandsma (pg. 3 of the document)
Other Jewish-Catholic Martyrs of the concentration camps
Beatified martyrs of the Communist persecution in Spain (in Spanish)
Lubeck Martyrs (Lutheran pastor was not beatified).
St. Maximillian Kolbe
St. Maximillian Kolbe accused of Anti-semitism for preaching Catholic teaching on Jewish conversion
The Play the “Deputy” shaped the negative perception of Pius XII, supported by the Soviets.

Review: The Rending of Christendom from Cruachan Hill Press

Presbyterians reject the book of Common Prayer in the Kirk, 1636

Presbyterians reject the book of Common Prayer in the Kirk, 1636

What is History? This is actually a more difficult and debated question than it would first seem. To the average mind, particularly having gone through public education, history is what the textbook said and what the teacher tested me on. Boring dates and battles memorized by rote or movies we watched while the teacher was busy. The more banal rendering would be these guys did this to those guys.

In reality history is much more than this. History relies on collecting written documents, archeology, use and nuance of language, art and poetry and weaving it into a narrative of a given people or culture. But how do we know that? For example, have you ever stopped and asked: “How do we know what we’re told about ‘x’ is true?” This is a far more complicated question. When you look at an artist’s conception of what Ancient Rome looked like, how do you know it really looked this way? While it might not be hard to figure out what the Flavian Ampitheatre (Coliseum) looked like, what about a street model or plan of Ancient Rome? In reality these are guesses based on archeology or what few monuments survive form the period. In the end we don’t really know that. So what can we know about history?

Continue reading

St. John Fisher: Resistance to Tyranny

St.JohnFisher2Today is the feast of the twin martyrs, St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More. There are books yet to be written on both, for all that have been written, but since so many more have been written on the latter I wish to write more on the former.

Now, in the first place, Fisher was a far greater theologian than St. Thomas More, who was a rhetorician and a lawyer, though no less devout a layman than Fisher was a bishop. Fisher established the seminary system in all but name, and made sure good preaching was the norm. This is rather an interesting thing.  In the late Renaissance, patronage, which was designed to move ahead those who were worthy had become instead a way of rewarding friends and picking favorites. Men became pastors and bishops solely due to royal favor, and the Popes tended not to care because they received the first year’s income of that diocese, a sort of Church tax called the Annates. Suffice it to say the whole thing had gone very wrong in the fifteenth century, and now preaching was a rarity. Some Bishops did not preach a sermon in their lives. Many bishops lived elsewhere, and would attempt to have other dioceses consecrated under them, or when those had been exhausted abbeys, so they could live it up in Paris or Rome or some other large city, and appoint a vicar for low pay to administer his diocese. These often did not do so well, particularly since they were not paid for the job. At the time St. Charles Borromeo entered Milan as its Archbishop, there had not been a Bishop who actually resided in Milan for 125 years! Yet that holy reforming bishop had a portrait of two saints in his room, one of St. Ambrose, and the other of St. John Fisher.

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The Glory of St. Patrick and the Tragedy of Ireland

The 17th of March as most know is the feast of St. Patrick in the Catholic Church. The story is well known, that Patrick was a Roman in Britain, who did not take the faith seriously and dabbled in various adventures, which led to him being caught by slave traders and sold into slavery in Ireland. He became more devout, went back to England persevered in the faith and was made a Bishop. From there he returned to Ireland and evangelized the whole of the emerald isle. Dom Prosper Guéranger has this to say about St. Patrick:

There are some who have been entrusted with a small tract of the Gentile world; they had to sow the divine seed there, and it yielded fruit more or less according to the dispositions of the people that received it: there are others, again, whose mission is like a rapid conquest, that subdues a whole nation, and brings it into subjection to the Gospel. St. Patrick belongs to this second class; and in him we recognize one of the most successful instruments of God’s mercy to mankind. Continue reading

Put an end to BCE and CE

Originally Published 7 May 2010 on the old Athanasius Contra Mundum

The Annunciation -Fra Angelico

The Annunciation
-Fra Angelico

I’ve been searching through a lot of historical documentaries lately, and I’ve been noticing some still use the dating “B.C.” and “A.D.” (Before Christ and Anno Domini), while others have switched over completely to the politically correct “B.C.E.” and “C.E.” (Before the Common Era and Common Era respectively).

One of the reasons I detest this change is not because some people are not Christian and don’t want reminders of the Church even in their dates, nor is it because some people think it shortchanges other religions. It is for the simple reason that it is dishonest. Continue reading

The Battle of Lepanto

The Coronation of the Blessed Virgin.  -Peter Paul Rubens

The Coronation of the Blessed Virgin.
-Peter Paul Rubens

For the great feast celebrating Our Lady’s intercession at Lepanto, I offer the following:

This is a good talk on the battle.

Then there is dramatic video, which starts slow but gets better.

Lastly, here is a talk on G.K. Chesterton’s poem Lepanto. None of it produced by me. I would do more, but I have too much on my plate to do this topic justice. Please pray for me and my family.