Author Archives: rubens7

Interview 043 — Taylor Marshall on Bellarmine and can a Pope become a heretic

On 31 January I appeared on Taylor Marshall’s show to speak on the much vexed question of St. Robert Bellarmine’s teaching in On the Roman Pontiff, book 2, ch. 30, as well as teaching from other works of St. Robert that make his teaching on this point rather clear. I read through the entire chapter, explaining the various points according to St. Robert’s ecclesiology, adding what he says in other works. Join us for a fantastic discussion on the topic:

Relevant citations:

On the Roman Pontiff, book 2, ch. 30; book 4, ch. 1-5; 22
On Councils, book 1 ch. 9; ch. 21.

Also, see the latest translation of Bellarmine’s works, On the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass:

Interview 042—Faith Matters with Philip Campbell on Renaissance Art

We joined Philip Campbell on his EWTN Radio Program Faith Matters to talk about the Early Renaissance. We discuss the Early Renaissance in Italy and the Netherlands.

Interview 041— Fr. Ripperger on the State of Theology in the Church

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We are joined again by Fr. Chad Ripperger, who has taken a break from his busy schedule and writing projects (which is one of the reasons it has been so long since we’ve had him on). Today, we’re talking about the state of Theology today, how modernism has affected it (properly what modernism is), how it has affected the laity, and how many errors are made in Theology. With that, he gets into what Theology properly is, and how it differs from knowledge of Catechism, and specific areas where people make mistakes. The discussion is wide ranging and fascinating form A-Z. Lastly, why it is that theological science and formation proper is necessary, even though many theologians today say heterodox things.

Sensus Traditionis

Episode Notes (NB: Work in Progress)

Pascendi Dominici Gregis
Descartes, Discourse on Method
Hume: Causation
Kant
St. Thomas, II IIae Q153 A 5

Operative points of view

Magisterial Authority

Binding Force of Tradition

Summa I Q1 a1 on science

Condemnation of Universalism from the 2nd Council of Constantinople:
If anyone says or thinks that the punishment of demons and of impious men is only temporary, and will one day have an end, and that a restoration (ἀποκατάστασις) will take place of demons and of impious men, let him be anathema.
Anathema to Origen and to that Adamantius, who set forth these opinions together with his nefarious and execrable and wicked doctrine and to whomsoever there is who thinks thus, or defends these opinions, or in any way hereafter at any time shall presume to protect them.

Parmenides

Tanquerey, The Spiritual Life

Cosmology (in a Philosophical sense)

Western Schism

Definition of Vatican I

The Principle of the Integral Good

On the Marks (Notes) of the Church – Bellarmine

St. Thomas on the Three Baptisms

Trent on Vernacular, Session 22 Can. 9

Quo Primum

Trent, Session 7 can. 14

In regard to Quod a Nobis, in the interview I said “St. Pius V made wholesale changes in the breviary” I meant St. Pius X, in his encyclical Divino Afflatu.

Luther: The Formula of the Mass

Trent, Session 21 ch. 2 [I said 23rd by mistake in the recording]:
It furthermore declares, that this power has ever been in the Church, that, in the dispensation of the sacraments, their substance being untouched, it may ordain,–or change, what things soever it may judge most expedient, for the profit of those who receive, or for the veneration of the said sacraments, according to the difference of circumstances, times, and places. And this the Apostle seems not obscurely to have intimated, when he says; Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and the dispensers of the mysteries of God. And indeed it is sufficiently manifest that he himself exercised this power,- as in many other things, so in regard of this very sacrament; when, after having ordained certain things touching the use thereof, he says; The rest I will set in order when I come. Wherefore, holy Mother Church, knowing this her authority in the administration of the sacraments, although the use of both species has,–from the beginning of the Christian religion, not been unfrequent, yet, in progress of time, that custom having been already very widely changed,–she, induced by weighty and just reasons,- has approved of this custom of communicating under one species, and decreed that it was to be held as a law; which it is not lawful to reprobate, or to change at plea sure, without the authority of the Church itself.

Interview — 040: Phillip Campbell on the Nitty Gritty of the Middle Ages, part 2

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Phillip Campbell joins us for part 2 of our conversation exploring the nitty gritty of the Middle Ages. In this conversation we will discuss lay control of the Church, Episcopal absenteeism, the failure of the two-sword theory; tournaments, jousts, trial by ordeal, whether peasants actually liked the days off as well as relations with Muslims. Join us as we deconstruct overly romanticized notions of our medieval heritage.

 

 

 

Episode Notes

Part 1
King Aethelbeht and St. Augustine of Canterbury
Ottonian Privilege (Privilegium Ottonium)
Investiture Controversy
Pope Gregory VII
St. Thomas à Beckett
Criminious Clercks
Location of Beckett’s Martyrdom:

Reference to British Law Documentary at 19:25: The Strange Case of the Law
Commendatory abbots
Compendium of the History of the Cistercian Order
Cluniac Order
St. John Fisher
St. Thomas Aquinas
Analysis of Medieval Tournaments
Church condemned Tournaments
Trial by Ordeal
The Victory of Reason by Rodney Stark
Three field crop rotation
Medieval Civilization by Jaques Le Goff
Cathedral, Forge and Waterwheel
St. Alphonsus on permissible labor on Sundays and Feasts [citation coming]
Fiorietti of St. Francis
Innocent III (Great book, not enough people buy it, I highly recommend it!)
St. Francis of Assisi
Correction: Nicholas of Cusa was not a Franciscan.
Cardinal Ximenes de Cisneros
Franciscan Spiritualists
A Capuchin Chronicle
Islam in the Middle Ages
Islamic goods traded in Europe
Muslim origins of Pasta
Islam under the Crusaders by Robert Burns
The Crusades by Zoe Oldenbourg
Petrobrusian Heresy
Ibn Jubiari and Trade and Cultural Exchange during the Crusades

More works from Phillip Campbell:
The Story of Civilization: Vol. 1; Vol. 2; Vol. 3
Heroes and Heretics of the Reformation
The Book of Non-Contradiction
Cruachan Hill Press

Interview 039—Phillip Campbell on the Nitty Gritty of the Middle Ages, and why most people will hate it

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Today, Phillip Campbell (aka Boniface) of Unam Sanctam Catholicam joins us to talk about the history of the Middle Ages, and why most people, traditional Catholics in particular, who have romantic notions of medieval life, would positively hate it. Not to dissuade one from study or admiring the Middle Ages, this conversation about medieval life is aimed at painting an accurate picture of it. Join us, as we dig into the nitty gritty of the middle ages.

**Warning**: [insert danger Will Robinson]
There are some points in the podcast where profanities are used demonstratively, as in medievals used the word in a title of this or that and we repeated it. Moreover there will be frank discussion of medieval views about sex and modesty and weird perverted things.  There will also be cool medieval music in Latin about bawdy subjects which would could not understand probably. If that offends you, or you thought this would be good for your younger kids, we give fair warning, you will not be happy.

Episode Notes:

Previous interviews with Phillip/Boniface:
Interview 014 on being a mayor in a small town.
Interview 024 on Pope Boniface VIII
Unam Sanctam Catholicam
Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch
Medieval end times views
Medieval Churches used for theater
The Theatre: Three Thousand Years of Drama, Acting and Stagecraft by Sheldon Cheny
Feast of the Ass
Feast of fools
Humility and State in Life
Golliards
Bacche Bene Venies
De Defectibus

Alphonsus Liguori on whether it is licit to have sex in Church
Instructions for Parish Priests by John Myrc (1400s)
Priests working secular occupations (barber/surgeon, lawyer), so common that Lateran II specifically forbid this in 1139
Jacques Fournier records people had sex inside the church (Béatrice de Planissoles)
-Source: Readings in Medieval History
Apostolic Origins of Clerical Celibacy, Cochini
Francis and Joseph Gies
Life in a Medieval Village
Life in a Medieval City

Limbourg Brothers

Related image
Mailoica Plate:
https://athanasiuscmdotorg.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/69d5c-maiolicaplate.jpg

abortion and contraception in the middle ages
Origin of the heart shape is from seed-pod of a Roman contraceptive plant:
(NB: I made a mistake in the podcast, I called if fenellinium, it was actually called silphium, got it all mixed up in my head).
A Cyrenian coin from the 6th century B.C., with a silphium seed imprinted in it.

Catullus on Silphium:
“as the number of Libyan sands that lie in silphium-bearing Cyrene.” (Poem 7)

Virgo Lactans, St. Bernard:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c7/BernhardClairvaux_Lactatio_SourceUnknown.jpg/220px-BernhardClairvaux_Lactatio_SourceUnknown.jpg
Troubador Movement
Liber Facetiarum of Poggio Bracciolini
History of Private Life Part 2
Codpieces
Medieval depictions of walking, sword-wielding genitalia (Danger Will Robinson! Crass, weird, odd, and just— enter at your own risk).
Edward IV
Unfortunate Wives of Philip II
Pope Alexander VI annulled the first marriage of Louis XII.
Pierre Darmon’s 1979 book Trial by Impotence.
For more on Henry VIII, see my own talks on the subject.
Politically active clergy:
Wolsey
Richelieu
Mazarin
Simony
Investiture Controversy
Albrecht of Brandenburg
Fuggers

 

Interview 038 — Fr. Ripperger on the abuse crisis and the theology of the priesthood


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Image result for Wuerl clericalism memeToday we are rejoined by Fr. Chad Ripperger, PhD, to talk about the abuse crisis in the Church in light of the revelations concerning former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the mass cover-ups carried out by bishops in Pennsylvania as revealed by the PA Grand Jury report, and the allegations against the Pope made by Archbishop Viganó. Instead of rehashing what has made the rounds on news, blogs and op-ed pieces, Fr. Ripperger discusses past Church legislation governing seminarians and clergy, and how the Vatican directed seminaries to deal with the problem of corrupt seminarians before Vatican II. He addresses the problem of homosexuality and the wider problem of a failure to keep chastity among seminarians, priests and bishops. Lastly, Father deals with the argument that everything is to blame on “clericalism” and shows that this is a veiled attack on the Catholic priesthood, and what the theology of the priesthood actually is. Not to be missed.

More resources for Fr. Ripperger
Sensus Traditionis
Sensus Traditionis Press
Society of the Most Sorrowful Mother

Episode Notes

Deliverance Prayers (With an imprimatur from the Archdiocese of Denver)

Our Lady of Sorrows
Diocese admits McCarrick violated minors
PA Grand Jury report shows Bishops covered-up
Archbishop Viganó alleges Pope knew about McCarrick
Modernism
Illud Horrendum Scelus of Pius V
Religiosorum Institutio
1917 Canon Law, Canon 2359, §2: “If clergy should engage in a delictum against the sixth commandment of the Decalogue with a minor below the age of sixteen, or take part in adultery, debauchery, bestiality, sodomy, pandering, incest with relatives or affines (kin) in the first degree, they are suspended, declared infamous, and are deprived of any office, benefice, dignity, responsibility, if they have such, whatever, and in more serious cases, they are to be deposed.”
Sacramentum Pœnitentiæ (Latin followed by English)
Rudy Kos

More episode notes will be compiled soon. I have to listen to it all again to make sure we link and source everything correctly.