Tag Archives: history

Interview 033 — Catholic Reform before Luther on The Mike Church Show

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Today I was a guest on the Mike Church Show to talk about the myths surrounding Luther and the beginning of the “Reformation” and the Catholic reformers that began before Luther even appeared on the scene; so that Luther’s revolt was not due to abuses in the Church, but errors in theology that he embraced.
While we provide our particular interview free, there are hundreds of hours of great content to hear on the Mike Church Show and the Crusade Channel on the Veritas Radio Network! Please support them by subscribing to their podcasts.

Episode Notes

The Spiritual Life and Prayer by Cecile Bruyére
Dom Gueranger
NPR Standard useless history on Luther and the Reformation
For biblical Learning in the middle ages, see the chapter on Wycliffe in St. John Fisher: Reformer, Humanist, Martyr for a scholarly summary.
Luther and the Bible
Erfurt University
Indulgences
Purgatory
***Shameless Plug Alert*** St. Robert Bellarmine’s treatise on Purgatory with copious references to the Greek Father
Tetzel
Myths about the 95 Thesis

For a summary of Luther’s lecture notes on Romans, see Philip Hughes, A Popular History of the Reformation
Exsurge Domine of Leo X
Cardinal Ximenez
Complutensian Polyglot Bible of Ximenez  (I made an error when saying this was done 17 years before Luther, although Ximenez was compiling, directing and paying for it as early as that, it was not actually published until 1520; the point still stands as this was not done in reaction to Luther but a project that began before Luther and was carried out before Luther).
Humility of Heart by Gaetano de Bergamo (New complete translation provided by Mike Church)
University of Louvain
Erasmus
BBC In Our Time podcast on Erasmus
James Latomus (I accidentally said “John” in the podcast)
Ruard Tapper
John Collet
St. Thomas More: A Great Man in Hard Times (with summaries of his positions and his contribution to Catholic Reform)
St. John Fisher 
Sermons of St. John Fisher
Thomas Vio de Gaetano (Cajetan)
Diet of Worms
Marcello Cervini
Frederick the III (The wise)
St. Gaetano de Thiene
Theatines
Comuneros Revolt
Movie on St. Ignatius of Loyola
Simpsons Henry VIII (warning, crass humour)
Lord Nelson buried in St. Paul’s
Capuchins
A Capuchin Chronicle
Man sentenced to Capuchin monastery begs to go to jail because religious life is too hard
St. Charles Borromeo
St. Philip Neri

Interview 027—Fr. Ioannes Petrus on Elections, Voting and Islam


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Saint_Augustine_by_Philippe_de_ChampaigneToday Fr. Ioannes Petrus re-joins us for a wide-ranging interview which is perhaps the first one I did not script with pre-planned questions. We discuss voting, the trajectory of government in the West, the current Holy Father, the threat of Islam, Immigration and how Christians should respond to the crisis of our times.

Episode Notes:

USCCB guide on Voting
“36. When all candidates hold a position that promotes an intrinsically evil act, the conscientious voter faces a dilemma. The voter may decide to take the extraordinary step of not voting for any candidate or, after careful deliberation, may decide to vote for the candidate deemed less likely to advance such a morally flawed position and more likely to pursue other authentic human goods.” (My Emphasis)

 

 

 

 

Non é Francesco
Teilhard de Chardin and the Cosmic Christ
Chagal and White Crucifix:

white-crucifixion-chagall_blasphemy

 

 

 

 

 

 

white-crucifixion_chagall_hebrew2

 

 

 

 

 

white-crucifixion_chagall_hebrew

 

 

 

 

Michael Davies talk on Savonarola
G.J. Meyer

Interview 026 – Reconquest with Brother André on St. Robert Bellarmine


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On 23 March I was on Reconquest! with Br. Andre Marie, MICM of the St. Benedict Center in New Hampshire to talk about the life and holiness of St. Robert Bellarmine. The first segment is a summary by Brother André, and in the rest of the show I join him to talk about his life, his holiness, the life of churchmen in the 16th century, and how Bellarmine, being full of holiness and love for the poor, excelled as a cardinal and as a scholar.

de_romano_pontifice_vol2_frontNB: I am preparing to release volume 2 of On the Roman Pontiff, which contains books 3-5. I am currently taking pre-orders discounted $6 from what the retail price will be. If you would like to pre-order, you can do so here and I will notify you when it is ready to ship.

 

 

Resources:

Catholicism.org
Missa Papa Marcelli mentioned in the talk.
Chicory

The god of surprises vs. the Tradition on Feet Washing

Just today, the Congregation of Divine Worship, at the command of Pope Francis, has decreed that women must be included in the Mandatum, that is the washing of the feet for Holy Thursday, effective this year. Thus, the god of surprises has come to visit us just in time for Septuagesima and the beginning of Lent.

There are lot’s of things to say, but the most important thing is to treat it dispassionately and in union with the Tradition. Pope Francis has said that those who resist change are closed to the working of the spirit, who cling to the way things have always been done are closed to the message of the Gospel. In spite of the twisting of the sense of Scripture in that particular discussion (my basis for which is the original Italian of Francis’ words, not some media report), let’s give him that for the moment. He posits a dichotomy of those who only want to do things the way things were, vs. those who want to apply new things. Thus we don’t receive a teaching and a praxis conditioned by the tradition of signs and symbols that lead us to Christ, to the teaching of the Gospel and the very person of Christ, but rather to the whims of this or that age. What is new and hip and inclusive in our age will be outmoded in the next age.

Moreover, the opposition is not comprised of those who say we must do everything as it has always been done, but that there is a reason why things have been done this way. Thus, the onus is on the Pope to explain why something in the traditional signs and symbols is somehow insufficient to express the reality of the Gospel. The problem is, he prescinds from this, and simply characterizes the opposition as a stick in the mud. It is one thing if he were to show how the traditional signs and symbols were insufficient for some reason, this is possible and the Church is in fact always in need of renewal. But can he show the use of men alone is somehow opposed to the expression of the Gospel?

The practice of washing the feet of men is supposed to express the relationship of Christ with his Apostles, not merely with the Christian community. Still, for all that, there is ample testimony of the Fathers that could be applied also to the community of the faithful, including examples where women’s feet were washed by the Bishop, just not during the Maundy Thursday liturgy. But then again, that might be too much the way things have always been done. The teaching of the Fathers on the question is well summarized by Cornelius á Lapide, in his commentary on the relevant passage of the Gospel (John XIII:6-10), which will suffice for our purposes here: [NB: My translation. There is a very good translation of this available from Loretto, but I do not have it at hand]

“St. Bernard understands in this place as if it were a  sacrament, a symbol, a type, a figure, a mystical meaning as he explains a little after, on which we will say more soon.
Symbolicly, Origen and St. Jerome [epist. ad Damasus, de prima visione Isaiae] reckon that Christ washed the feet of the Apostles in order that he might prepare them to preach the Gospel, according to what is said: ‘How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that brings good tidings, and that preaches peace: of him that shows forth good!’ [Isaiah LII:7; Rom. X:15].
Secondly, S. Ambrose, [de iis qui initiantur mysteriis, cap. vi] reckons that Christ in baptism washes away actual sins by washing the head, but here by washing the feet, he washed the remnant of original sin, that is, the motion of concupiscence, for in this washing of the feet, it is effected to have fortified them so that they would resist concupiscence.
Thirdly, St. Augustine and St. Bernard [de Cœna Domini] say: “By such feet we tread over the earth, the love of the earth is signified, filth and defects, which, while on earth, that is while we live among earthly affairs, just as the dust or mud on our feet it behooves us to wash by tears and penance, especially before holy communion.
Fourthly, St. Cyprian [de Cœna Domini] and St. Gregory [lib. ix epist. 39]: “Of the feet, which are the lowest and last part of man, the washing means not only that we must scrutinize our exterior works, but that we must descend even to the lowest and most intimate hidden corners of our conscience, and purge them from every secret stain and wicked intention through contrition, tears and groans.
From this washing of the feet by Christ, the custom of Milan, and several other churches, sprung up that the Bishop would wash those who were going to be baptized, and thereafter the priests and clerics in the font, who stood straight for this purpose outside the Church; thereafter the Bishop kissed the feet of those he washed, and they placed the outer part of the foot over the head of the bishop. St. Ambrose relates and defends this custom [lib. III de Sacram. cap. 1] and says that it was begun by St. Peter and Christ, wherefore he marvels that it is not kept in the Roman Church. Moreover, the Council of Toledo [XVII, cap. iii] ratifies that the Bishops and priests should wash the feet of the faithful at the Lord’s supper after the example of Christ, and commands the use which had ceased for a while to be recalled.
St. Ambrose relates the mystical nature of this washing [lib. De initiandis, cap. VI] saying: “Peter was clean, but ought to wash the sole [of the foot] : for he had the sin of the first man by succession, when the serpent supplanted it and persuaded error; therefore his sole is washed so that hereditary sins would be abolished.” He alludes to those words of God to the serpent concerning man: “Thou shall lie in wait for his heal,” [Genes. III:15]. The same Ambrose [lib. III de Sacram., cap. 1] says: “Because Adam was supplanted by the devil, and the poison flowing into him and over his feet, therefore you wash the feet so that in that part, in which the serpent lies in wait, shall come upon a greater sanctification, in which afterward he cannot supplant you. Therefore you wash the feet, so that you wash the poison of the serpent. Moreover, it will effect humility, so that you will not blush in the mystery, that we will not disdain obedience.”
Another reason was more literal, because formerly those to be baptized approached with naked feet, that they would conduct themselves with humility. For that reason, this nakedness of the feet is called humility by St. Augustine [lib. de Symbolo ad Catech., cap. 1]; because they will wash the filth that has been contracted on the feet. This custom began to spread from the Church of Milan to others, as is clear from St. Augustine.”

Now, we could go on at length with many more testimonies to the same thing. What we can see is that the objections of some, that the priest will kiss a woman’s foot at the mandatum, was not a problem for St. Ambrose and the fathers of other churches where this custom spread to. Then again, the culture was not as over-sexualized as it is today where you have foot fetishes and other things of immoderate men. I don’t know if such a thought would occur to most priests, but it may to some laity. So if Francis wanted to overturn the custom prevailing in all Churches of only washing men’s feet, he could appeal to this example in the Fathers, that such washings were done from the Lord’s example for the community (men and women) who were to be baptized, and then he might have some ground to stand on in terms of uniting this symbol at the liturgy with the example of antiquity. But then his notion of mercy, trumpeted so much at the last synod in regard to public adulterers, could be exposed to attack by the same example. Again from á Lapide, on John XIII:10:

“Mark, here Christ alludes to those who wash themselves in a bath, who go out from it with their whole body being cleansed, but because they tread upon the earth with their naked feet, therefore they might say the feet, for that reason alone are washed afterward. Mark secondly, Christ speaks anagogically [that is, in regard to man’s final state] that by his custom they rise from corporal washing to a spiritual one, in other words, one who is washed is done so spiritually through baptism, in which I have washed you, O Apostles, or one who is washed through contrition and penance, here is wholly clean in soul, but still needs that he wash only his feet, that is the affects of the soul, again by reason of earthly things, in which they live, are stained by contagion and contract light filth that they must often purge through contrition, castigation of the body and like virtues (of which this my washing is a symbol), and especially before the Sacred Liturgy and reception of the Eucharist. Thus St. Augustine, Bede, and especially St. Bernard [serm. In Cœna Domini] say: “He who is washed, needs nothing but that he should wash the feet. He is washed, who does not have grave sins, whose head, that is intention, and hand, that is the operation and good life, is clean; but the feet, which are the affections of the soul, while we step in this dust, from the whole cannot be of the world, which at some time tread in vanity, lust or curiosity, it rather more behooves the soul that it should fall even now. For we all offend in many things. But no man scorns or slights. For it is impossible to be saved by those, it is impossible that I have washed except through Christ Jesus, and by Christ.”

Whereas, directly contradicting what Christ said, that he who divorces his wife and marries another (Matt. XIX) commits adultery, can that be said to be a light matter? Not a grave sin?

Nevertheless, picking up in the next paragraph with Lapide, we see the relationship of Christ with the Apostles:

“Therefore, Christ, in this washing of the feet of Peter and the Apostles cleanses sins, especially venial ones, because through that and only through His forgiveness does he goad their minds, and admonished them by making internal washing through contrition in their souls, through which venial sins are expiated.
For this reason, priests in the OT washed their feet and hands before the sacrifice, as I have already said. Likewise, many heathen did the same thing, as Brissonius recalls [lib. I De Formulis Roman., pag. 4]. Formerly the Jews did the same thing, as is clear from Mark VII:4, and they still do the same thing today.
Next, St. Augustine [epist. 108 ad Seleucianum] from “qui lotus est“, probably gathers that Peter and the Apostles were baptized before the Eucharist, then because no man has the capacity for the Eucharist unless he has been baptized, for after His death he baptized no man, it is certain that they were all either immediately or mediately baptized by Christ. Then, the “washing” would probably have been the washing done in baptism.”

Thus, the relationship expressed in the washing of the feet of the Apostles by Christ, is not just of a hierarchical relationship, though that is properly one aspect, but one of the intimate communion that his Apostles, as priests conformed to Christ’s very person, share with him in spite of their human nature. They are washed as preparation for becoming priests of the new and eternal covenant, of which baptism is necessary, that is being put to death to the world, and born anew in Christ Jesus. The mandatum, as preserved and passed down in the sacred liturgy of Maundy Thursday, is intended to preserve this identification of Bishops and Priests as other Christs, being cleansed from sin and made unto him, whereas the early Church (as seen in St. Ambrose, St. Augustine and the Bishops of other Churches, as Lapide mentions) also sought to incorporate the symbol of the Bishop conformed to Christ, the suffering servant who is nonetheless God, in the rite of baptism.

As a side note, Catholics should take note that the practice of blessing themselves with Holy Water when they come into Church derives from this ancient practice, which is why the modern practice in many modern churches of removing the holy water during Lent an replacing it with sand is all the more inexplicable.

Now, as I noted, Pope Francis could overturn this particular tradition in the mandatum under the desire to emulate the Baptism of the faithful, but if that were the case he should give very clear reasons as to why the old symbol were inefficient to this, or why the expression of the priesthood as perfectly conformed to Christ as servants no longer satisfies and should be expressive of who we are today. In fact, the very purpose of liturgical symbols is to remind men of changing fashions what the symbols represent and call them back to the gospel—both clergy and laity—not to correspond to changing fashions. What Pope Francis has done, is to destroy a symbol without any particular reasoning or purpose apart from what seems inclusive for today. And therein lies the very problem. A protestant friend of mine very aptly encapsulated the faulty reasoning of this initiative in the following satire:

“I hereby propose that a reasonably accurate modern equivalent of Jesus washing the disciples’ feet would be Jesus doing their dishes. Harder to fit into the Maundy Thursday service, though.”

Could it be that Pope Francis is the one doing things the way they have always been done—since 1965?

Interview 020 – Charles Coulombe revisiting the American Revolution


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On Independence day we decided to celebrate in an entirely different way, with a re-examination of the American Revolution against Great Britain, the factors involved, and numerous details not found in your history books.  Charles Coulombe, a writer, researcher and fellow pipe-smoker joins us to shed light on the inconvenient details of early American history hidden from your history books.
NB: After the interview we discussed a matter which should have perhaps prefaced it: many people will be mad at this, especially if you are of tea-party persuasion. The charge of “treason” and “unpatriotic” behavior will be leveled, I’m sure. Patriotism, properly love of the land and countrymen, is a virtue, distinct from the thoughtless worship of the government. We both adhere to the former, as every good Catholic should since true patriotism is a virtue; while have nothing to do with the latter.

Resources for Charles Coulombe:

Charles_CoulombeMuse in the Bottle (my personal favorite)
History of the Popes
Puritan’s Empire
The Pope’s Legion: The Multi-national Fighting Force that defended the Vatican
Haunted Places in America: A guide to spooked and spooky places

Interview Notes

School House Rock: No More Kings
The Quebec Act
Freedoms given Catholics were Denounced by Declaration of Independence: or abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies”
[This is a whole bunch of nonsense, the word “Abritrary government” is an old WASP buzzword for Catholicism, they extended freedom in Quebec which the apostles of “Liberty” found intolerable]
Taxes were Higher after the American Revolution
Cost of the Seven Years War (French and Indian war)
John Hancock smuggled tea
Shays Rebellion over high taxes after the revolution
Unruly Americans (reference to taxes pg. 29)
American Heresy
Lord North
Viscount Howe
Cousin’s wars
For detailed analysis of anti-Catholic propaganda during the English Civil War, see: “The English Civil War: Papists, Gentlewomen, Soldiers and Witchfinders” by Dianne Purkiss. Excellent work.
First legal Catholic Church in the Empire since James II
Appointments in England, Scotland, Ireland, made by Henry, Cardinal Duke of York (brother of Bonnie Prince Charlie).
Rebels tended to be closer to the centers of power or wealth, whereas loyalists tended to be more poor.
War of the Regulators
American President more powerful than any monarchy
For more on recycling of the same propaganda during the American Revolution, see the documentation in Liberty the God that Failed, by Chris Ferrara.
John Pym
Trial of Charles I, claimed that he negotiated with the Pope
Rome ready to offer a red hat to Bishop Laud
Debate between Laud and a Jesuit named Fisher
Scots Highlanders tended to be English Loyalists
Flora MacDonald
Letter of Continental Congress to England concerning the Quebec act (drafted by John Jay for the Congress)
Letter of Continental Congress to Quebec
Father (later Bishop) John Carrol excommunicated by Bishop of Quebec
Traveled to Quebec with Benjamin Franklin
St. Elizabeth Anne Seton
Samuel Seabury
Scottish Episcopal Church
Lord Dunmore offered Freedom to any slave who would join the British Army
Blacks in the Colonies were pro-British
Samuel Johnson opposed Independence
Benedict Arnold
Founding Fathers and Freemasonry
Catholic British Loyalists
Jacobite Rebellion
Aude Sapere 004 – Scottish Independence
History of Scotland: Shadow King (overview of Jacobite Wars through Culloden – No longer available, probably copyright.
Continental Congress offered the Crown of the United States to Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1778
Just in case you are too young to remember Theodoric of York
Culloden Moor
Bishop Hay, vicar apostolic of Scotland

Interview 014 – Boniface on being a mayor in a small town


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Campaign PhotoToday Boniface joins us, who readers might remember was my co-author on the old version of Athanasius Contra Mundum. Today he talks to us about his experience as the mayor of his small town in Michigan. We discuss the challenges and realities facing local government, the problems of the economy, being a “job friendly” town, and the problems of government in general, wherein we contrast the system today with Catholic jurisprudence and political thought, and discuss solutions.

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