Tag Archives: Latin

Interview 033 — Catholic Reform before Luther on The Mike Church Show

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Today I was a guest on the Mike Church Show to talk about the myths surrounding Luther and the beginning of the “Reformation” and the Catholic reformers that began before Luther even appeared on the scene; so that Luther’s revolt was not due to abuses in the Church, but errors in theology that he embraced.
While we provide our particular interview free, there are hundreds of hours of great content to hear on the Mike Church Show and the Crusade Channel on the Veritas Radio Network! Please support them by subscribing to their podcasts.

Episode Notes

The Spiritual Life and Prayer by Cecile Bruyére
Dom Gueranger
NPR Standard useless history on Luther and the Reformation
For biblical Learning in the middle ages, see the chapter on Wycliffe in St. John Fisher: Reformer, Humanist, Martyr for a scholarly summary.
Luther and the Bible
Erfurt University
Indulgences
Purgatory
***Shameless Plug Alert*** St. Robert Bellarmine’s treatise on Purgatory with copious references to the Greek Father
Tetzel
Myths about the 95 Thesis

For a summary of Luther’s lecture notes on Romans, see Philip Hughes, A Popular History of the Reformation
Exsurge Domine of Leo X
Cardinal Ximenez
Complutensian Polyglot Bible of Ximenez  (I made an error when saying this was done 17 years before Luther, although Ximenez was compiling, directing and paying for it as early as that, it was not actually published until 1520; the point still stands as this was not done in reaction to Luther but a project that began before Luther and was carried out before Luther).
Humility of Heart by Gaetano de Bergamo (New complete translation provided by Mike Church)
University of Louvain
Erasmus
BBC In Our Time podcast on Erasmus
James Latomus (I accidentally said “John” in the podcast)
Ruard Tapper
John Collet
St. Thomas More: A Great Man in Hard Times (with summaries of his positions and his contribution to Catholic Reform)
St. John Fisher 
Sermons of St. John Fisher
Thomas Vio de Gaetano (Cajetan)
Diet of Worms
Marcello Cervini
Frederick the III (The wise)
St. Gaetano de Thiene
Theatines
Comuneros Revolt
Movie on St. Ignatius of Loyola
Simpsons Henry VIII (warning, crass humour)
Lord Nelson buried in St. Paul’s
Capuchins
A Capuchin Chronicle
Man sentenced to Capuchin monastery begs to go to jail because religious life is too hard
St. Charles Borromeo
St. Philip Neri

Interview 018 – Chris Ferrara discusses Laudato Si


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pope_francis_eco-friendlyToday we are joined by Chris Ferrara, the president of the Catholic Lawyers Association, a well known Columnist for the Remnant, the author of The Great Façade, The Church and the Libertarian, and his magnum opus: Liberty: The God that Failed. Chris today, comments on where Francis appears to be taking us with Laudato Si. Should we cheer the anti-globalist sentiments and the condemnation of Malthusian approaches? Should we celebrate the few scant references to abortion? Or are there foundational problems with the language in the encyclical that we should be weary of? Should Distributists harken to the condemnations of globalism and abuse of resources? Or is there a radical departure from the tradition of Catholic thought which we should be worried about? Join us for an in depth conversation on the document.

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St. John Fisher: Resistance to Tyranny

St.JohnFisher2Today is the feast of the twin martyrs, St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More. There are books yet to be written on both, for all that have been written, but since so many more have been written on the latter I wish to write more on the former.

Now, in the first place, Fisher was a far greater theologian than St. Thomas More, who was a rhetorician and a lawyer, though no less devout a layman than Fisher was a bishop. Fisher established the seminary system in all but name, and made sure good preaching was the norm. This is rather an interesting thing.  In the late Renaissance, patronage, which was designed to move ahead those who were worthy had become instead a way of rewarding friends and picking favorites. Men became pastors and bishops solely due to royal favor, and the Popes tended not to care because they received the first year’s income of that diocese, a sort of Church tax called the Annates. Suffice it to say the whole thing had gone very wrong in the fifteenth century, and now preaching was a rarity. Some Bishops did not preach a sermon in their lives. Many bishops lived elsewhere, and would attempt to have other dioceses consecrated under them, or when those had been exhausted abbeys, so they could live it up in Paris or Rome or some other large city, and appoint a vicar for low pay to administer his diocese. These often did not do so well, particularly since they were not paid for the job. At the time St. Charles Borromeo entered Milan as its Archbishop, there had not been a Bishop who actually resided in Milan for 125 years! Yet that holy reforming bishop had a portrait of two saints in his room, one of St. Ambrose, and the other of St. John Fisher.

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Interview 015 – Fr. Michael Driscoll on Exorcism and the Traditional Latin Mass


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fr_driscollToday we are joined by Fr. Michael Driscoll, a priest of the diocese of Peoria IL, for a frank conversation about the TLM vs. the NO, issues in the liturgy following Vatican II, as well as issues relating to exorcism and his book Demons, Deliverance Discernment: Separating Fact from Fiction about the Spirit World. Continue reading

De Romano Pontifice Published for the first time in English!

de_romano_pontifice_front_coverJust today is a historic day for Bellarmine. Today is the first time his work “On the Roman Pontiff” has been made available in English translation. This is a beautiful and fantastic polemical and apologetic work defending the Papacy from the attacks of 16th century Protestants, many of the arguments of whom are used today, even though Bellarmine actually refuted them quite well.

Now, I have a special offer for readers of this website. This work retails for $20.00 on Mediatrix Press, but I have arranged that readers of this website may purchase the book at a discount using the following link: Athanasius Contra Mundum Discount! That is, with the discount it will be less than the price of On the Marks of the Church even though it is twice the size! This offer won’t last forever.

Thanks again to everyone whose support has made this possible.

Temporary break

I apologize for the break in posting. I was hoping to keep things more regular. I have, however, been very busy. Later today, I hope to announce the publication of the first-ever English translation of St. Robert Bellarmine’s De Romano Pontifice, books 1-2. Books 3-5 are planned for next month, depending on the editors.

It is interesting. After I produce a rough draft, which isn’t usually as hard on grammar as on punctuation, I then go and edit and reformulate a bit. Then the editor gets it and I get it back with a ton of red. Most of it is punctuation. The problem is when you are looking at a book from the 1580s, you tend to use the punctuation you are looking at unless you can consciously stop and think about what you’re doing, which is hard when your managing making the English work. Usually, it is that commas and semicolons are in the exact opposite places they ought and things of that sort.Then there is the Oxford comma. I love the Oxford comma, no one else does. Then there are the differences between US and UK spelling, and I get mixed up as I admire UK English and so wish we used it over here. (btw, now would be a good time to apologize to any UK readers of my work for not using what I consider your superior style in spelling and punctuation).

Then I run spell check, which is tedious because of the large number names that you have to either add or skip, then I format it for a proof copy, then I read it over again. Then I control F and look for the common spelling errors as a result of my typing speed, such as hte for the, and the like, and surprisingly I always get at least one, even after all the aforesaid labor! Then I normally give things like this to my wife, because, though she is not theologically trained, she is sharp and has a good sense for what people will understand, and make further recommendations which are usually very good, unless it’s on an area of technical terminology or something. That saved my tail with the last Bellarmine translation, because I do my own translations from the fathers, and a few of them made sense to me because I looked at the Latin and the Greek and it made sense, but in plain English it was too harsh, so I had to discipline myself to take a careful look. The frustrating thing is I do the work of about five people who are normally involved in the production of the book, including the cover design.

At any rate, I hope to make this announcement later in the day, once the proof is approved and the Amazon page loads. You can also buy it direct from me, and I will have that page linked up as well.

Thanks to all for the prayers and support for the Robert Bellarmine project. I know most people will buy the book for Book II, Chapter 30 (loss of papal office), but that is a minor point. On that note, a sedevacantist e-mailed me demanding to know if I translated that particular section correctly. The cheek! One can rest assured that while I may make an error, I will never mis-represent something in translation. You will find that section better than it is currently found online.

But don’t get mired in a 7 page explication out of a 330 page book! There are so many amazing things in here. In fact, in the wikipedia page on Papal primacy, they list a number of arguments against Papal primacy as though they were unanswerable, yet they are all refuted by Bellarmine in this book. Things like did the African Bishops reject papal authority in the Sixth Council of Carthage? Did Peter go to Rome? The chronology and history of Peter. That only the Bishop of Rome has been held to be the head of the whole Church. Every argument is grounded in Scripture and the Fathers. Bellarmine also injects a good bit of humor into the book. For instance: “Illyricus (a Lutheran) has published a book on this subject, which is filled with lies, abuse, and besides two arguments.”

I might even have a special deal for all readers of this website.

Francisco Suarez on what to do if the Pope falls into heresy…

suarez

Francisco Suarez, S.J. “Doctor Eximius”

 

For some time the question of the loss of papal office has been of interest to certain segments of Traditionalism. One of the many “Francis-effects” we could speak of, however, is that this question has gone mainstream due to the Pontiff’s many gaffes or statements that at least leave one scratching their head to figure it out, even amongst some conservatives who are not Traditionalists. In fact, Francis’ papacy is causing a lot of discussion on a lot of issues regarding the Papacy as such, and in particular in the conservative world, as can be seen from Antionio Socci, a conservative, non-Trad Medjugorie devotee, who questions Francis’ election and even published a book on the subject. Now I’m not saying Francis is a heretic or not really the Pope, even though I can properly say I am perplexed and often annoyed when he says nearly anything. Regardless of what I think, this is becoming an increasingly discussed issue.

So, in order to add something positive to the question, I have provided Suarez’s assessment of the loss of Papal office, which will be an interesting addition to the more generally known opinion of his Jesuit confrere St. Robert Bellarmine. Continue reading